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Nuts + Nutrition

Nuts are more than a delicious source of protein, good fats, and important vitamins and minerals, making them a great go-to snack or recipe addition. Learn more about what each unique and tasty nut can bring to your table!

Pecans

Fast fact: “Pecan” comes from the Native American word “paccan,” which means a nut with a shell so hard it must be cracked with a stone.

Indigenous to the South Central U.S. and Northern Mexico, pecans are high in fiber and contain 20 grams of fat per one ounce serving. Plus, pecans have 21 vitamins and minerals, and are an excellent source of manganese.1

See Nutrition Information for Fat Content.

Pecans

Walnuts

Did you know that walnuts are the oldest known tree food? Or that they’re the most common nut used in American home-cooked recipes and restaurant dishes? In the late 1700s, some Franciscan fathers from Mexico and Spain brought walnut trees to California, which now produces 70 percent of the world's walnuts.

Walnuts are an excellent source of alpha-linolenic acid (the plant based omega-3). An ounce of walnuts is an excellent source of copper and manganese, and a good source of magnesium.1

See Nutrition Information for Fat Content.

Walnuts

Almonds

Almonds are universally loved for their light, sophisticated flavor, and they also have a robust history. The early Romans showered newlyweds with almonds for fertility, and in Southern Europe, almonds were honored as a symbol of good luck. In America, gifts of almonds represent happiness, romance, good health and fortune.

Almonds, a cholesterol-free food, contain 14 grams of fat per one ounce serving and are a good source of dietary fiber. Just one ounce of this little nut gives you 35 percent of your daily allowance of vitamin E. They’re an excellent source of manganese, riboflavin, and magnesium and a good source of phosphorus and copper.1

See Nutrition Information for Fat Content.

Almonds

Cashews

Today we refer to the cashew as a nut, but it’s actually a seed. Grown at the bottom of a delicate, pear-like fruit, cashew’s closest relatives include mangos and pistachios. And even though cashews are cultivated inside an extremely protective, honeycombed shell, they are the only nuts marketed exclusively without their shells.

An ounce of roasted cashews contains high levels of copper. Cashews are also a good source of vitamin K, magnesium, manganese, phosphorus and zinc.1

See Nutrition Information for Fat and Saturated Fat Content.

Cashews

Peanuts

When you consider that the average American consumes 12 pounds of peanuts a year, it’s safe to assume it’s a popular nut. Or is it? Actually, the peanut isn’t a nut at all, but a legume, which means it grows underground like a potato and is related to peas and beans.

Peanuts contain mostly beneficial mono-unsaturated and poly-unsaturated fats, which have been shown to help lower blood LDL-cholesterol levels.5 One ounce of plain, dry roasted peanuts contains 9 percent of your daily needed fiber and 14 grams of fat. Peanuts are also a good source of niacin (vitamin B3) and contain essential minerals, such as magnesium, phosphorus and manganese.1

See Nutrition Information for Fat Content.

Peanuts
REFERENCES:
  1. USDA National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference, Release 28 (2016), www.ars.usda.gov
  2. USFDA/CFSAN/Docket 02P-0505 July 14, 2003
  3. Nutrition labeling of Food, Code of Federal Regulations, 21 CFR 101.9, Release date April 1, 2010.
  4. Walnuts.org
  5. American Peanut Council, www.peanutsusa.com